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Review: #8591 Vorahk

Review LEGO 8591 BIONICLE

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#1
RobExplorien

LEGO BIONICLE Rahkshi #8591 Vorahk
Review by RobExplorien
 

BIONICLE was the first succesful LEGO series of this century and one of the first series to feature an elaborate storyline around the theme (which I never really knew about). The series features various biomechanical-like creatures that consisted of Technic and special 'theme-bound' parts*, and I read somewhere that BIONICLE is actually a blend of the words BIOlogical (I'd have expected BIOmechanical) and chroNICLE. The BIONICLE sets made its first appearance in 2001 and was discontinued in 2010, were it was succeeded by (the lesser) HERO Factory. For me BIONICLE sets didn't have a big role in my younger building years, but occasionally I was given a BIONICLE set for my birthday. The set I'm actually going to review I bought at a local flea market a while ago.

*parts that only appear in a specific line or subtheme

 

Well, you've had an introduction now and I know that there a quite some members here who are already very known to this theme and/or storyline (to just mention Prototyke with his pixelated craftings of BIONICLE masks). So the set is #8591 Vorahk, a BIONICLE from the Rahkshi faction/race. Apparently Vorahk has a storyline (he being a great hunter of the Rahkshi), but it is nowhere mentioned in the instructions or container/canister. The set is from 2003 (the container dates back to 2002) and was sold at a retail price of $8,99/£5.99 (according to Brickipedia), but I got it at the flea market for about €3,-. They sell the BIONICLE sets in these cylinder shaped containers with the boxart wrapped around it, as you can see below in the image. Vorahk is depicted in his battle position and on both sides are BIONICLE masks pictured (mainly visible on the far right). The LEGO logo is up-front pictured with the name of the BIONICLE next to it in a fitting font. Above Vorahk is the BIONICLE logo with the URL of the theme's website below. Also, this set is intended for ages 7 and up.

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The lid of the container is on the bottom (the black part/left) with a strange scepter-like symbol on it of which I'm not sure what it means. The top of the container (right) shows another symbol molded into the container and the remains of the molding proces in the middle. If someone could inform me on the meaning of those symbols, that'd be great.

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I open the container and find:
- 45 pieces
- instruction manual
All together it weighs 200g/7.1oz. One thing that catches the eye is the trans-orange part which will be placed behind his mask. It will give the menacing glow in Vorahk's eyes. Furthermore there are some chrome and darkgrey BIONICLE elements along with a few Technic pieces. The manual has the same cover as the boxart. You may notice that it's wrinkled and has some cracks, but otherwise it's fine and perfectly readable.

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The instructions look a lot different than the regular LEGO System set instructions. The step numbers are outlined and the images seem to be 3D rendered. It is explained in 15 steps how to build Vorahk, a lot for just 45 pieces if you ask me.

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It starts by building the torso. One big shoulderpiece is connected with a gear which can be turned via a handle on the back.

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Vorahk's arched back is now in place with flexible spikes on it. He looks like he's worshipping something in this position.

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Just the foot itself has a lot of detail. His leg is almost the size of three minifigures stacked on top of each other.

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And let the fight begin, Vorahk is ready to destroy those puny guys that call themselves 'minifigures'. What I just love about the BIONICLE sets are the joints; the ability to move the arms, legs and head in almost any kind of position. Plus, turning the gear on the back causes his arms to swing left and right. Vorahk does not only distinguish himself from the other Rahkshi warriors by colour, but also with his special type of spikes and weapon.

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Why not break the weapon apart in two smaller ones. By the way, Vorahk is about 20cm/8inch tall.

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You can also open his back, which reveals his, eh, brains? It is a rubber piece and since it is placed behind his head I assume that it is that. Does the brain jump out and attack others? I don't know, but I like the inclusion of this feature.

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The instructions show you how to 'fold up' Vorahk to place him in his container. It is a bit of a struggle, but you'll get him in there eventually. But where do I leave the instructions then? I could hardly get Vorahk in there.

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It turns out that there are instructions as well for combining this set with two other Rahkshi warriors, #8587 Panrahk and #8590 Guurahk. Now I notice how all names of Rahkshi warriors end with the same syllable. Combine the three sets and you can make some sort of walker with a modified version of Vorahk riding it. It looks cool but I can't build it as I'm missing out on the other two sets.

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The last pages of the instruction manual show some other BIONICLE models. I must say that they look pretty weird, but neat nonetheless.

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The back of the instruction manual shows the six collectable Rahkshi warriors, each with their corresponding background hue. I got the red one too, but I'm still looking for the parts I'm missing for that set.

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Thus we get to the end of this set review, and to summarize this review:

  • I like the container. It is easier to take with you than a square box and you have some kind of pod for your BIONICLE.
  • The instruction manual has 3D rendered images and overall fit well in the theme. The instructions are easy though, too easy to follow.
  • Though I'm not a fan of special-made parts for sets in such amounts, the BIONICLE series get a free ride on this. It gives a completely new look to LEGO models (for the relatively new theme at the time) and adds a new building technique to the LEGO universe, plus most of the parts in this set are also used for the other Rahkshi warriors (in different colours).
  • Vorahk looks badass to me. The glowing eyes, the spikes on his arched back and his dark colours all add to this badass look. You can move his limbs in almost any kind of position and he has an attack (the arm swinging).

 

Rating
  Design: 8/10
Quality: 8/10
Fun: 7/10
Price: 8/10


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#2
JimbobJeffers

Along with the original creatures released with the Toa (I forget the terminology) and the Bohrok, I think the Rahkshi were my favourite enemies. I particularly loved how they flew in the movie.

 

Nice review, this yet again makes me want to collect some of the old Bionicle sets :)



#3
PWNZOR

Along with the original creatures released with the Toa (I forget the terminology)

They were Rahi - wild creatures, effectively. Not all were evil. Nui-Jaga and Nui-Rama were particularly nasty (mostly territorial), as was the Tarakava. Ussals were domesticated, as was some bull creature that I can't remember.

 

The Rahkshi were cool in their own way, but I feel they were a bit unoriginal. I mean, 6 of them, each the same color as the Toa, each having very similar elemental powers as the Toa...



#4
Zephyria

Along with the original creatures released with the Toa (I forget the terminology)

They were Rahi - wild creatures, effectively. Not all were evil. Nui-Jaga and Nui-Rama were particularly nasty (mostly territorial), as was the Tarakava. Ussals were domesticated, as was some bull creature that I can't remember.

 

The Rahkshi were cool in their own way, but I feel they were a bit unoriginal. I mean, 6 of them, each the same color as the Toa, each having very similar elemental powers as the Toa...

None of the Rahkshi had elemental powers...they each had unique powers, exclusive to them.
Like Panrak? Wherever he stepped, the ground exploded underneath his feet.


I think you're mixing the Rahkshi with the Bohrak.



#5
PWNZOR

 

Along with the original creatures released with the Toa (I forget the terminology)

They were Rahi - wild creatures, effectively. Not all were evil. Nui-Jaga and Nui-Rama were particularly nasty (mostly territorial), as was the Tarakava. Ussals were domesticated, as was some bull creature that I can't remember.

 

The Rahkshi were cool in their own way, but I feel they were a bit unoriginal. I mean, 6 of them, each the same color as the Toa, each having very similar elemental powers as the Toa...

None of the Rahkshi had elemental powers...they each had unique powers, exclusive to them.
Like Pahrak? Wherever he stepped, the ground exploded underneath his feet.


I think you're mixing the Rahkshi with the Bohrak.

I know my Bionicle. I know my Bohrok from my Bohrok-kal from my Rahkshi.

 

No they weren't stone, fire, ice, elements like that. But they had powers that countered the Toa Nuva. One sapped strength, while Onua Nuva's mask was that of Strength. One was anger, playing off Kopaka Nuva's coldness. One was poison, countering the lush live environment of Lewa. And so on.

 

The difference between the Bohrak and the Rahkshi was that there were only 6 Rahkshi, while having swarms of Bohrok. There were only 6 Bohrok-kal, so there was already another line of only 6 elemental beings. And after 3 (technically 4, counting the Toa Nuva as separate) lines of 6 elemental beings, adding another line gets a bit old, that's all I'm saying. They are still cool and all, but I mean, look at the history of Bionicle - almost ever single saga of Bionicle follows this pattern - the Rahi/Toa Mata saga is the main one that didn't follow it.



#6
Alcom1

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The Rahkshi don't have an element. Instead they have a power that counters a principle for each village. Oddly, Lerahk, Panrahk, and Guurahk don't counter the village of the same color, while the other three Rahkshi do. Additonally, the non-matching Rahkshi were part of the first wave sent by Makuta Teridax, while the matching Rahkshi were part of the second wave.



#7
aidenpons

You were talking about the meaning of those symbols...

The first one, I'd guess, is Vorahk's symbol.

I KNOW the second one is the Bionicle logo. Don't ask me why it's that. Ask Greg somewhere else. (Greg was the main writer for BIONICLE)



#8
Guurahk204

The lid of the container is on the bottom (the black part/left) with a strange scepter-like symbol on it of which I'm not sure what it means.

 

 

That's the Rahkshi symbol, it's a concept art of the look of the Kraata slugs (and actually how they look in the movie).



#9
Trydeltix

Each Rahkshi has one of the Makuta powers. All Makuta have a large set of special Kraata powers, and when they create a Kraata by pulling it from their very esssence, the Kraata and resulting Rahkshi has one of those powers. (chain lightning, heat vision, disintegration, etc.)

 

About the BIONICLE symbol: Its supposed to represent the three virtues of the Matoran. (Unity, duty, destiny) It also represents the three main planets in the BIONICLE universe, Bara Magna, Aqua Magna, and Bota Magna. Up until 2009, the story was set in Aqua Magna, in a 40 million foot tall robot (Mata Nui) containing the Matoran Universe. The three planets were once one large planet, Spherus Magna, until an explosion caused by the unstable planet core blew the whole planet into three pieces. This event is known as the Shattering. At the end, this planet is reformed into Spherus Magna by Mata Nui after an intense battle with Makuta Teridax, , and then BIONICLE was canned. :(


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