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Lego Rock raiders. First sight of the future?

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#1
Ben24x7

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I once had a look at the crome cusher in a dark area (please note it was daytime) and I noticed that the Tr. Fluore. Green (the pick-a-brick colour name for the yellow-green transparent pieces) glow around the edges, this also worked for energy crystals, but it wouldn't glow-in-the-dark and now I'm thinking... "Could this be an early version of glow-in-the-dark elements?"

 

Post up comments or more theories to add more info to this theory.



#2
JimbobJeffers

I doubt it was an early version of glow-in-the-dark elements. From what I've read, transparent LEGO parts are made from PolyCarbonate rather than the usual ABS plastic, as ABS isn't transparent. Quoting Wikipedia: 'Polycarbonate is highly transparent to visible light, with better light transmission than many kinds of glass.' Which suggests that perhaps it is just more reactive to light, although I'm no expert on this.

 

Also, the Rock Raiders line wasn't the first to use transparent parts. For instance, the Ice Planet 2002 sets feature iconic orange transparent elements, and these were released six years before Rock Raiders.

 

So, basically, I don't think so. But then it's likely someone else here who knows way more than me could very easily contradict this statement.


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#3
jamesster

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... Seriously?

LEGO has had glow in the dark stuff since 1990, nine years before Rock Raiders, and transparent pieces since 1950.

http://www.bricklink...talogColors.asp
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#4
Fushigisaur

Well considering the color is called Transparent Fluorescent Green...

#5
McJobless

say-what.gif

uwotm8?
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#6
Lair

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Is it appropriate in times like this to say "kids these days"?


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#7
Fushigisaur

Is it appropriate in times like this to say "kids these days"?

Oui

#8
Pranciblad

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Why exactly is this in the fan fiction section?


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#9
Alcom1

Kids these days.


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#10
BobaFett2

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As said above, glowing parts have existed since ghosts, so no.
It's not actually glowing, sorry.

 

Kids these days.



#11
Tracker

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It does glow, but only under UV, violet, or blue light.



#12
Cyrem

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Props to JimbobJeffers for an actual decent reply without the attitude of the other replies.

 

That is an interesting thing you've spotted. Generally, when you get a transparent piece, the edges of the piece will look brighter than the rest. This is due to lighting and not necessarily any 'glow' this piece may have. I've never actually seen a fluorescent piece of LEGO (whether they make any I don't know) but it would look quite good on RR sets for night scenes.



#13
Ben24x7

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Well... I would've been impressed if they were glow in the dark but it means it would have to be white which wouldn't fit the Rock raiders colour scheme. And why are you all saying "kids these days"? You think I'm a very young person! Well, do you expect a very young person to say physudonim? (or how you spell it (it means false name)).  :zzz:  *calms down*  :wimp: < Sorry... Very off topic... my own topic! )



#14
Fushigisaur

Well... I would've been impressed if they were glow in the dark but it means it would have to be white which wouldn't fit the Rock raiders colour scheme. And why are you all saying "kids these days"? You think I'm a very young person! Well, do you expect a very young person to say physudonim? (or how you spell it (it means false name)).  :zzz:  *calms down*  :wimp: < Sorry... Very off topic... my own topic! )

Pseudonym. One's ability to say large words is not an indication of age, and the fact that you would think it is does not exactly help your case. Especially since you couldn't even be bothered to look up the correct spelling.
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#15
Cirevam

Cut it out with the "kids these days" comments, especially when a bunch of you ARE KIDS. Maybe if you took a second to read your own posts before posting them you would see that you're being non-constructive and pretty much insulting.

Jimbob and Cyrem seem to be the only people who actually understood what the topic creator was talking about. I can break it down a little further. Transparent pieces are definitely made with a different kind of plastic as Jimbob said, but why do these pieces seem to glow at all? It's due to a phenomenon called "total internal reflection." When a beam of light strikes something transparent, it will do certain things depending on how it hit the surface. If it's directly into the surface, it goes through. But if it's a glancing hit, it will reflect either partially or completely. You can sometimes notice this if you look at a window from close to the side.

There is a defined angle for each kind of material where this transition between partial reflection and total reflection occurs. It is called the "critical angle", but I have seen it called the "minimum glancing angle" too. You will notice this much more in rounded pieces such as antennas, since the light will bounce off of the shallow rounded angles and be trapped inside for quite some time before it escapes at a single point. More light in one spot is brighter, of course, so the edges can look brighter under certain conditions. I'm not sure why it does that for pieces with hard edges like energy crystals, but perhaps it has something to do with how the plastic hardened.

http://en.wikipedia....rnal_reflection
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