Jump to content

Photo

Can my computer handle Direct 3D HAL?


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1
le717

Maybe, maybe not...

 

 

This my laptop, a brand new one running Windows 8 x64 (however, for the price, it should have came with Win8 Pro, not plain Win8...) with an Intel integrated GPU and nVidia discrete mobile GPU. Island is set to run the on the latter.

 

O.T.
If a video doesn't belong in the screenshots section, Cyrem, let me know and I'll put it in my blog. But a video is just a sequence of images playing in a high-speed successive order, so technically it should be allowed here. :P



#2
MrEightThreeOne

Actually I was sort of surprised, I haven't seen it run this well in a long time. You especially had a crapton better luck than I did on my now-dead HP computer...

I'm kind of curious to know if this would actually function properly on a computer built to run it. I hear if you have the right stuff it can run really well. From what I know, the Voodoo1 was rather popular when this came out, so I'd imagine it would be the first card of choice...



#3
le717

Actually I was sort of surprised, I haven't seen it run this well in a long time. You especially had a crapton better luck than I did on my now-dead HP computer...

-snip-

I'm kind of curious to know if this would actually function properly on a computer built to run it. I hear if you have the right stuff it can run really well. From what I know, the Voodoo1 was rather popular when this came out, so I'd imagine it would be the first card of choice...

 

Yea, I was a bit surprised myself. I actually watched your video as it uploaded.

 

Hmm.... I wonder if the Voodoo1 card had the same.... what do you call it... driver, display instructions, whatever it is, as Intel or AMD cards...



#4
jamesster

Direct3D HAL mode works perfectly on my sister's XP laptop, and it's from 2009 or so.

#5
MrEightThreeOne

Doubt it. It's decades behind AMD and Intel cards. I played it the way most kids did when it first came out, though -- with SOFTWARE 3D acceleration. On a Pentium II. Hilariously, I think I ran it at the perfect speed -- the turning was actually tolerable rather than sensitive, and the shelf switch in the helicopter room actually was synchronized with the sounds. As in, those two taps you hear at the end of the sound effect actually happened as the parts hit the shelf.

EDIT: Jinx, you owe me a soda.



#6
le717

I just ran Island in D3D HAL again, but this time running on the Intel chip. It was the same, except it did not crash when exiting.

 

There has got to be a way to run this game the way it was designed, but what...



#7
Tracker

Tracker

    AIV

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,250 posts

Get an old computer.



#8
noghiri

If you've got a spare copy of XP or 95 lying around, have you tried a VM?

 

and Tracker, the point of this thread, I believe, was to play it on modern hardware.  An old computer is cheating, and doesn't work for those of us without older computers, or those of us with only Linux boxen and DOS consoles on their non-gaming PCs.



#9
le717

If you've got a spare copy of XP or 95 lying around, have you tried a VM?

 

You haven't heard legoking rant about VMs, have you? :P Yes, I have a Win98SE disc running in a VM, but it didn't copy all the required files to PRECOPY, so it is completely broken.



#10
noghiri

I haven't heard the rant.

 

I was trying to get it to run native in RAMP mode, using Baz's (Baz'?) guide.  It froze on the screen where you normally see the Infomaniac, and when I tried to kill it with the command line, it caused a bluescreen.



#11
mumboking

Direct3D HAL didn't work on the Win98 Packard Bell my mum has.

It has a Hercules 3D Prophet II MX graphics card in it.



#12
LimeKiller

LimeKiller

    Critically hit for 0 damage.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts

I've heard the VM rant, but I still use VMs. I'm using one right now to type this. And Lego Island has always worked perfectly for me in one.



#13
le717

I've heard the VM rant, but I still use VMs. I'm using one right now to type this. And Lego Island has always worked perfectly for me in one.

 

What VM, OS, and what graphics mode is Island running in?



#14
LimeKiller

LimeKiller

    Critically hit for 0 damage.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts

VMWare Player with Windows XP Service Pack 3, and MMX Emulation.

It has to be run in 640x480 resolution, and in the virtual machine, it won't stretch to your screen. The game only takes up a little window in the middle.



#15
MrEightThreeOne

Lego Island works just fine on a VM, since it can use software 3D acceleration. You just can't put it in Direct3D HAL and one other type of emulation I forget (I think it was RGB, I don't know though). In fact, it runs on my old 486...TERRIBLY.

D3D HAL just seems like a half-finished mode in all honesty. It seems like they took the people who didn't have hardware acceleration more into account (I don't blame them -- most kids' parents wouldn't buy their kid a GPU in that day!), so I imagine they spent more time on those modes, seeing how they adapt to modern computers better.

But then again, why is D3D HAL the default setting if you have hardware acceleration?